Tag Archives: campaign

Library closures and their impact on children’s literacy.

What libraries do for us – and me is an article written by Malorie Blackman on The Guardian‘s ‘Comment is free’ page which took my interest last week.

Blackman emphasised the point that libraries are the “best literacy resource we have” and with many public libraries closing across the country, there is concern that it could have some impact on literacy rates in children. It is thought that approx. 105 libraries have closed or left their local authority control since April 2012.

Many local councils have announced library closures. Lincolnshire plans to close 32 of its 47 libraries and Sheffield are to keep 12 out of 28 libraries open. Blackman commented on culture minister Ed Vaizey’s quick decision to save Jane Austen’s ring leaving the UK, in August, and said how he should be showing the same concern to save our libraries. Like Austen’s ring, libraries are considered “national treasures”.

There have been numerous complaints that the closures are in breach of the 1964 Libraries Act, which specifies that “every authority must provide a comprehensive and efficient library service”. Although despite this the article states that the government are yet to become involved in investigating the complaints.

Blackman questions why these closures are happening in a time where the government has placed emphasis on children’s reading and has also announced plans to reform secondary education, in particular the changes to GCSEs. It is no doubt that libraries offer a fantastic service. Story-telling sessions for young children, homework clubs and knowledgeable staff make up a safe environment where children, and adults alike, can discover and explore.

While libraries make up a significant part of our cultural heritage and have a positive impact on communities across the country, I feel that libraries can only do so much. What I mean by this is children’s parents must also play a significant part in encouraging their children to read and visit the library. Unless a child’s parent takes them to a library on a regular basis, then the child will not encounter the benefits. These library closures also make me wonder whether booksellers will offer more services to make up for those lost through closures? Booksellers could hold story-telling afternoons for young children and themed art and craft days to get children involved in literature. It can also be suggested that bookshops could offer a scheme where parents could trade-in bought books for other secondhand books at a small fee, particularly for those families who may have a low income. Suggestions which hopefully won’t have to be considered.

Blackman’s article finishes with the statement: “Without them [libraries], literacy may increasingly become the province of the lucky few, rather than the birthright of everyone”. “The Institute of Education stated that children reading for pleasure between the ages of 10 and 16 can drastically improve vocabularly and attainment and is extremely important for a child’s cognitive development”. With this statistic, it can be seen that library closures will have a negative impact on literacy in children.

There are, however, sites such as the Voices for the Library which “advocates for public libraries and library staff”. The site presents some encouraging statistics and stated that although library visits were in essence, down, visits via libraries’ websites were in fact up, with more loans being issued via websites. According in CIPFA, book issues increased in 2009 from 307,571,240 to 310,776,757. In addition it is thought that during the period 2008-9, web visits to UK libraries were up 49%. So while, libraries are closing, library usage via websites are up emphasising the point that “these are times of opportunity, not decline”. Like bookshops, libraries can embrace change by enhancing the use of digital. A great example is the new library which opened in Birmingham recently (you can read my blog post on it, here). The new building is a successful mix of tradition and discovery reflected through the incorporated use of digital devices to enhance learning. Certainly, it is current news such as this which shows just how much opportunity there is for libraries in general.


Books Are My Bag

The Books are My Bag campaign was one of the prominent sights of the London Book Fair this year. I heard about the campaign on Twitter and immediately looked at the website to see what it was all about.

The campaign promotBooks-are-my-bag-logo-textes the UK’s bookshops. (If you look in the ‘Bookshops’ category, you can see that I have mentioned them a lot on my blog!) Bookshops have been featured in the news over the past few months for numerous reasons. M&C Saatchi are behind the project and are focusing on two main strategies: a PR campaign and a street campaign. The former will launch mid-September 2013 through til Christmas and will celebrate bookshops with many celebrities and authors supporting the project. There will also be opportunities for bookshops themselves to promote the campaign in stores. The latter is in the form of Books Are My Bag tote bags. (After following someone around half of the LBF yesterday, I managed to get one!) The campaign has been backed by booksellers, publishers and authors, as well as the Publisher’s Association and is said to be the biggest promotion of books and bookshops in publishing history.

“BOOKS ARE MY BAG celebrates books and bookshops and the simple truth that bookshops do more physically to let people enjoy their passion for books.” – taken from the BAMB website.

I believe the BAMB campaign is a fantastic way to promote bookshops. I believe it will encourage the public to think twice before they decide to log onto Amazon and make them think differently about the importance of bookshops. In addition, I feel that it will make publishers value sellers a lot more. With the threat of bookshops increasingly becoming extinct, I feel that the push to celebrate bookshops will be the right move in keeping booksellers on the high street.

Moreover, I also feel that the Foyles bookshop move and the #FutureFoyles project next year will also allow the public to seeĀ  bookshops in a brand new light.